Read The Match by Mark Frost Online

the-match

The year 1956 Eddie Lowery, once caddie to Francis Ouimet, now a wealthy car dealer and avid supporter of amateur golf, boasts to fellow millionaire George Coleman that two of his salesmen US amateur champion Harvie Ward and up and coming star Ken Venturi could beat any golfers in the world in a best ball match Coleman asks Lowery how he plans to prove it Bring any two golfers of your choice to the course tomorrow morning, Lowery tells him, and we ll settle the issue Coleman shows up all right with Ben Hogan and Byron Nelson, the game s greatest living professionals In Mark Frost s peerless hands, complete with the recollections of all the participants, the story of this foursome and the greatest private match ever played comes vividly to life....

Title : The Match
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 0751540404
ISBN13 : 978-0751540406
Format Type : EPub
Language : Englisch
Publisher : Sphere 31 Juli 2008
Number of Pages : 272 Seiten
File Size : 989 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Match Reviews

  • P. J. Somers
    2019-05-21 17:00

    Mark Frost most certainly the skills to keep the readers attention, but with this material from which to work he produced a story impossible to put down. The game of golf has always been rich with characters and fine gentlemen whose stories are worth telling. Sadly today's youth are probably moving too swiftly to sit down and read and learn from these gentlemen, but they should.

  • Donald Mitchell
    2019-05-02 16:17

    Golf is a game whose attraction is built in part from legendary events like Ouimet's historic win in Brookline. You need to add this story from Cypress Point to your after-round repertoire.Two wily veteran pros, Ben Hogan and Byron Nelson, help accept a challenge on behalf of George Coleman made by Eddie Lowery, Francis Ouimet's caddy at The Country Club in the U.S. win, that no one can beat Eddie's two amateur employees, Ken Venturi and Harvie Ward. Bets are placed and the game is on.To make the story even more interesting, Mark Frost gives us the histories of the people involved against the backdrop of the switch from an amateur focus for the game to a professional one. You'll also learn about how Cypress Point was developed.Working primarily from the memories of Byron Nelson and Ken Venturi, Mark Frost captures the scene almost as though he were an eye witness. Needless to say, the match contained some remarkable golf. I won't go into it, but I found my heart pounding many times as the competitive situations unfolded in the high stakes Nassau.I've never seen Cypress Point in person, and the story also interested me for its fine explanation of the course's layout in 1956.

  • Donald Mitchell
    2019-05-14 17:13

    Golf is a game whose attraction is built in part from legendary events like Ouimet's historic win in Brookline. You need to add this story from Cypress Point to your after-round repertoire.Two wily veteran pros, Ben Hogan and Byron Nelson, help accept a challenge on behalf of George Coleman made by Eddie Lowery, Francis Ouimet's caddy at The Country Club in the U.S. win, that no one can beat Eddie's two amateur employees, Ken Venturi and Harvie Ward. Bets are placed and the game is on.To make the story even more interesting, Mark Frost gives us the histories of the people involved against the backdrop of the switch from an amateur focus for the game to a professional one. You'll also learn about how Cypress Point was developed.Working primarily from the memories of Byron Nelson and Ken Venturi, Mark Frost captures the scene almost as though he were an eye witness. Needless to say, the match contained some remarkable golf. I won't go into it, but I found my heart pounding many times as the competitive situations unfolded in the high stakes Nassau.I've never seen Cypress Point in person, and the story also interested me for its fine explanation of the course's layout in 1956.

  • CapNComeback
    2019-05-14 12:56

    I’m 60 years old and loved and played golf for over 20 years until severe back problems forced me to quit (along with all the other sports I love, especially running). I knew all four players in this story except for Harvie Ward, whom I had never heard of. Since the game the book is about took place in 1956, I wasn’t even born yet so I never saw any of the players play. But of course I knew who Ben Hogan, Byron Nelson and Ken Venturi were. Ken was still announcing golf on TV when I was younger and I knew Mr. Nelson as the old gentleman who would open the Masters with a ceremonial first drive. The only thing I knew about Ben Hogan’s life I learned from the movie “Follow The Sun”, which I didn’t realize was such a poorly shallow rehash of Hogan’s life. But that was really all I knew about them and it’s really a shame that you could live for 60 years, love golf and NOT know this story (or more about the men in it). I think I remember reading that they were making a movie based on this book but if not, they really should. The movie “The Greatest Game Ever Played”, based on the book of the same name (and coincidentally written by the same author) is the best golf movie in existence in my opinion. When I was a teenager, even Arnold Palmer was past his playing prime and so was Jack Nicklaus except for his amazing Masters victory at aged 47 (I can’t swear to his age but for an athlete he was old and I don’t mean that in a disrespectful way at all). There is a postscript to this book and it was, for me at least, a must read. I’d recommend reading this book to the very end since it tells of the man and woman who actually designed and built Cypress Point. The guy who designed it also designed a little course called Augusta National. Buy this book and read it. You won’t regret it even if you don’t play golf. My only regret is that I didn’t know this story or about Cypress Point when I was stationed at Camp Pendleton early in my Marine Corps career. If I had, I would have made the drive just to see the course even if it wasn’t possible to play it.

  • Mary
    2019-04-29 11:56

    I don't play golf but my husband and son do so I read this book to be able to discuss it with them. I was surprised to find that it was a wonderful read that gave me real insight to the people who played the game for all the right reasons. I loved hearing about how some of the women influenced the game and the description of Cypress Point. It is amazing to know how the game got its start in America and how much it has improved over the years. Very enjoyable.

  • C. White
    2019-04-25 13:58

    Was introduced to Mark Frost through his fantastic book, The Greatest Game Ever Played (the movie does not do it justice) and bought this to replace my copy I had bought a few years ago, lent out and have yet to have returned. This book is able to wind golf history, Hollywood and an incredible four ball match seamlessly in a way that you will want to keep reading it. I have never played Cypress Point but felt I was right there with each shot. It was if I was walking the fairways with an old friend who, in between shots, tells you a little side story as to the history of each player and how he had arrived here. In recently re-reading it I had forgot how much I had enjoyed it the first few times I read it.

  • Mark Sutter
    2019-04-24 20:01

    One of the most entertaining books I've read in quite some time. The book was very well written and held my interest throughout. What made it even more interesting was the way the author interspersed the stories of the main characters with the story of this ultimate golf match between the two best amateurs of the time against arguably the two best pros of the time. The hole-by-hole description of the match was so vivid it was almost like watching it on TV.

  • Robert Dana
    2019-05-14 16:58

    This is my favorite golf history book.Golf and baseball are two sports that translate best into good literature. The Match is reminiscent of Peter Gammons’ Beyond The Sixth Game because it’s primary thesis is that The Match involving Hogan, Nelson, Venturi & Ward - like the Red Sox - Reds game in the 1975 World Series - changed the sport for ever.The biographies of the four men at the center of The Match, which biographies are presented in the book, are compelling. The backdrop of Cypress Hill is special. I recommend reading it by referring to a map of each hole of the course. You can pinpoint each shot, which Mark Frost presents in detail.An added bonus is the story of Marion Hollins, the woman behind the development ofCypress Hill and later Pasatiempo.I can not say enough about this wonderful book. All the more so because The Match was played on the day of my birth - January 11, 1956.