Read Chu's First Day of School Board Book by Neil Gaiman Online

chu-s-first-day-of-school-board-book

Chu s First Day of School is a perfect read aloud story about the universal experience of starting school Now this picture book adventure about the New York Times bestselling panda from Newbery Medal winner Neil Gaiman and acclaimed illustrator Adam Rex is available as a board book.Chu, the adorable panda with a great big sneeze, is heading off to his first day of school, and he s nervous He hopes the other girls and boys will be nice Will they like him What will happen at school And will Chu do what he does best...

Title : Chu's First Day of School Board Book
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 0062371495
ISBN13 : 978-0062371492
Format Type : Boardbook
Language : Deutsch
Publisher : -
Number of Pages : 408 Pages
File Size : 699 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Chu's First Day of School Board Book Reviews

  • NCSurfer
    2019-05-12 12:51

    This is one of the more creative, imaginative, and unusual books I've read in a long, long time. Sad I discovered it so late; it's truly a remarkable read. A long book, yet reads like a summer novel. Go ahead, dive into Gaiman's wild imagination. Be prepared for unexpected twists, turns, and delightful weirdness. A classic.

  • Donald Tilleman
    2019-04-30 20:38

    As the title of this review clearly states, I saw the TV series before I read this book, in fact I did not know this book existed and I was quite certain that it would not be a book I would enjoy reading, after all, the series revealed all the secrets.

  • Marc B Kaplanes
    2019-04-24 12:23

    I felt the writing was very articulate, but not too high brow. It was very readable. The main character was a likeable guy, but I felt I never really knew him. The defining moment that happened prior to the book opening was never really explained. Overall I felt like there was no middle to the story. You just meandered along trying to figure things out and then it's the finale. Even the finale was anti-climactic. I'm not really sure what happened. I could see how this might be a compelling tv show with the visuals, but it left too much to my imagination. It was well written and it flowed along fine, but I wanted more depth.

  • Carol
    2019-04-20 13:45

    In "American Gods" Gaiman has, once again, done his research and created an attention holding book with plenty of action, humor and darkness. Showing gods of the "old world" as near mortals that feed on prayer and sacrifice to survive in our new technology driven culture is an ingenious take on religious evolution. Gaiman has a knack for taking a idea that would inundate most writers with its vastness and narrowing it down to an empathy-invoking quest of one man, Shadow Moon. That he can make a character named "Shadow Moon" into a total badass is a feat in and of itself. I have been an on the fence reader of Gaiman for a while, but this book shoved me into his camp with two firmly planted feet. The only question lingering in my mind, despite being referenced in the epilogue, is why Gaiman avoided the Christian God or Trinity. While reading about the new gods of media and technology, as if no other religion had prevailed, I could not help but feel the lack of Christianity was to make a larger point about American culture (or perhaps modern culture) but a fairly inaccurate one. I am by no means looking for a religious statement or subtext in my reading but to ignore something so ingrained and still powerful in American culture seems a misstep in my opinion. It had crossed my mind that perhaps Gaiman did not want to offend or alienate this group of people with any perceived blasphemous statements and I hope this is not the case given the premise of the book. I, instead, chose to view supernatural world Gaiman has created as an alternate reality in which only the gods mentioned exist. This hole did not detract from the story whatsoever and I have recommended this book to many and will continue to do so.

  • darswords
    2019-04-29 14:52

    What if you mix a radio show, comparative religion, with a road trip? This is it!